Kwok-Pong ‘Bobby’ Tso: Industrial landscape: The View From Above Series No.3, 2012, White earthenware, cone 04 oxidation, sanded surface, additional detail created by plastic, metal, and wood, H 13, W 20, D 16

Kwok-Pong ‘Bobby’ Tso: Industrial landscape: The View From Above Series No.3, 2012, White earthenware, cone 04 oxidation, sanded surface, additional detail created by plastic, metal, and wood, H 13, W 20, D 16

Brian Kakas: Dimensional Transitions Series #5, 2008White Stoneware, slab built, 43” H x 28”W x 35”L, Cone 7 Reduction

Brian Kakas: Dimensional Transitions Series #5, 2008
White Stoneware, slab built, 43” H x 28”W x 35”L, Cone 7 Reduction

Brian Kakas: Dimensional Transitions Series #4, 2008White Stoneware, slab built, 44” H x 34”W x 37”L, Cone 7 Reduction

Brian Kakas: Dimensional Transitions Series #4, 2008
White Stoneware, slab built, 44” H x 34”W x 37”L, Cone 7 Reduction

Brian Kakas: Tectonic Perceptions – Nautilus Series, Detail image, 2011White stoneware, slab built, 32” H x 23”W x 24”L, Anagama Fired

Brian Kakas: Tectonic Perceptions – Nautilus Series, Detail image, 2011
White stoneware, slab built, 32” H x 23”W x 24”L, Anagama Fired

Brian Kakas: Tectonic Perceptions – Nautilus Series, 2011White stoneware, slab built, 32” H x 23”W x 24”L, Anagama Fired

Brian Kakas: Tectonic Perceptions – Nautilus Series, 2011
White stoneware, slab built, 32” H x 23”W x 24”L, Anagama Fired

Jorie Johnson (Joi Rae): My Rising Sun With In: Dark Green carpet series 2011, 106 x 170cm, natural color and acid-dyed wool; Landscape Fragments cushion series 2011, wool felt cover, cotton cushion, suede. Photo by Toyoda Yuzo.  After the March 2011 earthquake/tsunami/reactor explosion I realized that we all look at Japan in a different way. So in reference to the name Land of the Rising Sun, I was working through current queries about my life here in Japan. / Keiko Gallery - Japanese artists

Jorie Johnson (Joi Rae): My Rising Sun With In: Dark Green carpet series 2011, 106 x 170cm, natural color and acid-dyed wool; Landscape Fragments cushion series 2011, wool felt cover, cotton cushion, suede. Photo by Toyoda Yuzo.
After the March 2011 earthquake/tsunami/reactor explosion I realized that we all look at Japan in a different way. So in reference to the name Land of the Rising Sun, I was working through current queries about my life here in Japan.
/ Keiko Gallery - Japanese artists


Tomohide Ikeya photography from the “BREATH” series.

“We only realize the true value of the things in the moment of losing them, “BREATH” is my latest work, focuses on breath, a vital activity of human-beings which is controlled by ourselves. An infinite number of air bubbles appeared in the water enables us to see ‘breath’ with vivid clarity.  Although we breath unconsciously in our ordinary lives, it is not easy to breath under water Losing air that we need for life, being enabled to breath, being controlled by water. We realize true value of things that always exist around us, in the moment of losing them. Some people accepts its control and wait for the end to come without bidding defiance to it, The others are thirst for life, struggling against it and trying to control themselves. That is the contrast of holding on to life, which appears clearly under water. “BREATH” asks viewers questions.  What is the things you should know the value of, hold on to and control? And what is the most necessary thing for your life?” (via)

Tomohide Ikeya photography from the “BREATH” series.

We only realize the true value of the things in the moment of losing them, “BREATH” is my latest work, focuses on breath, a vital activity of human-beings which is controlled by ourselves. An infinite number of air bubbles appeared in the water enables us to see ‘breath’ with vivid clarity. Although we breath unconsciously in our ordinary lives, it is not easy to breath under water Losing air that we need for life, being enabled to breath, being controlled by water. We realize true value of things that always exist around us, in the moment of losing them. Some people accepts its control and wait for the end to come without bidding defiance to it, The others are thirst for life, struggling against it and trying to control themselves. That is the contrast of holding on to life, which appears clearly under water. “BREATH” asks viewers questions. What is the things you should know the value of, hold on to and control? And what is the most necessary thing for your life?” (via)