Cynthia Lahti: Vault Alarm
Ceramic sculptures on wooden base (created for the Bellevue Arts Museum Biennial 2010)

Cynthia Lahti: Vault Alarm

Ceramic sculptures on wooden base (created for the Bellevue Arts Museum Biennial 2010)

Grayson Perry

Grayson Perry's profile on Ceramics Now Magazine - View his works

Grayson Perry (born in 1960) is an English artist, known mainly for his ceramic vases and cross-dressing. He works in several media. Perry’s vases have classical forms and are decorated in bright colours, depicting subjects at odds with their attractive appearance, e.g. child abuse and sado-masochism. There is a strong autobiographical element in his work, in which images of Perry as “Claire”, his female alter-ego, often appear. He was awarded the Turner Prize in 2003 for his ceramics, receiving the prize dressed as Claire.

Perry’s work refers to several ceramic traditions, including Greek pottery and folk art. He has said, “I like the whole iconography of pottery. It hasn’t got any big pretensions to being great public works of art, and no matter how brash a statement I make, on a pot it will always have certain humility… For me the shape has to be classical invisible: then you’ve got a base that people can understand”. His vessels are made by coiling, a traditional method. Most have a complex surface employing many techniques, including “glazing, incision, embossing, and the use of photographic transfers”, which requires several firings. To some he adds sprigs, little relief sculptures stuck to the surface. The high degree of skill required by his ceramics and their complexity distances them from craft pottery. It has been said that these methods are not used for decorative effect but to give meaning. Perry challenges the idea, implicit in the craft tradition, that pottery is merely decorative or utilitarian and cannot express ideas.

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Daniel Kavanagh

Daniel Kavanagh's profile on Ceramics Now Magazine - View his works

“Forms are classical yet contemporary defined by crisp elegant lines and flowing shapes; inspired by ancient Greek pottery and Japanese as well as the art and architecture of South East Asia. The Highland landscape is a constant, ever changing influence in my work, drawing inspiration from the light, space and reflective qualities this vast landscape offers.

Contrast is an important aspect to my work the interplay between control and unpredictability, traditional and contemporary, solid but with a feeling of lightness. Despite these contrasting qualities I always aspire to create something that is both beautiful and complete. I enjoy the interplay of more organic and fortuitous surfaces applied to these controlled forms which create a distinct finish to the work. Work that combines ceramic and bronze materials provide an innovative exploration of the two mediums I am most passionate about. I am beginning to explore the experience of how a thrown form can then be adapted to become a piece of sculpture in its own right.” Daniel Kavanagh

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Adam Frew

Adam Frew's profile on Ceramics Now Magazine - View his works

Adam is a story teller, sometimes intuitively, always spontaneously, and this reveals itself in his work.  The white porcelain is a perfect ground for the inky cobalt drawings which decorate his pots. Some imagery is restrained to the simplicity of a single line and other images depict busy narratives. Simple sprigs reminiscent of wax seals from a bygone era embellish some of the surfaces.

“It is important that there is a flow in my work and if I loose that flow, I loose the energy. My work is an ongoing journey”. Adam Frew

‘The nature of Adam’s ceramic pots allows the owner to continually revisit their purchase, gaining pleasure from seeing new and wonderful things in its quirky decoration.’ Kim Mawhinney, Head of Art. Ulster Museum

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