Ceramic artists list
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installation

Kerry Jameson: Unbounded / Marsden Woo Gallery, London

Kerry Jameson: Unbounded exhibition, Marsden Woo Gallery London

Kerry Jameson: Unbounded / Marsden Woo Gallery, London
November 7 - December 21, 2013

Kerry Jameson’s new sculptures have an emotional charge that is presented through a mix of narrative set pieces, tableaux and individual figures. Subjects include historical events and the exploits of folkloric and storybook characters. She derives inspiration from an equally eclectic range of sources, which include portrait paintings, the figures of British myth such as the Burryman and Wicker Man, the work of animator Ray Harryhausen, a fascination with the polychrome religious sculptures of 17th century Spain and the toy collections of the Bethnal Green Museum of Childhood. She explains: ‘A work starts with a thought or feeling, an undigested experience that needs to be worked through.’

She says: ‘I want to capture life in my work, a sense of movement, the feeling of something living… a constant state of transition.’ This ambition is experienced inthe faintly disquieting feeling that one of her figures might just spring into action. It is also apparent in the attention she gives to keeping the material qualities of a piece ‘alive’. Dissatisfied with the seeming permanence of fired clay, she adds layers and detail through the use of other materials to create nuanced effects. In addition to the ceramic base, components of a figure can be hessian, canvas, wool, fur, wood, paint, seeds, stones and sometimes hyper-real glass eyes.

Each of the works is either an imaginative exploration of a possibility or reflects on some human idiosyncrasy. In this world part-animal/part-human characters abound. Scenes from the past are also played out, as in her battle sequence based on Pickett’s Charge during the Battle of Gettysburg - representing a famous military blunder of the American Civil War - thereby reflecting on how misplaced human confidence can override logic and reason. With reference to both her subject matter and approach, Jameson admits to an interest in ‘things that aren’t quite right’ and to ‘things that happen on the boundaries’, rather than on firm, fully rational ground. The predominant aesthetic is that of the uncanny – where objects or ideas are recognised as familiar and at the same time experienced as deeply strange.
Words by Tessa Peters

Gallery hours: Tuesday to Friday, 11:00 - 18:00 and Saturday, 11:00 - 16:00. The nearest tube stations are Barbican, Farringdon or Old Street.

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  • Jannis Kounellis / Parasol unit foundation for contemporary art, London

    Jannis Kounellis exhibition Parasol unit foundation for contemporary art, London

    Jannis Kounellis / Parasol unit foundation for contemporary art, London
    28 November 2012 – 24 February 2013

    Preview: November 27, 2012, 6:30 – 9:00 pm.

    Parasol unit foundation for contemporary art is delighted to present a solo exhibition of works by painter, sculptor and performance artist Jannis Kounellis from 28 November 2012 to 24 February 2013 (Private View, 27 November 2012).

    Considered a protagonist of Arte Povera, an art movement that emerged in Italy during the 1960s, Kounellis embarked on his artistic career by creating some of the most radical art works of the time. Often combining the inanimate and animate, he boldly incorporated things such as propane torches, plants and animals as integral if not vital parts of his works. He also introduced the notion of performance within works of art, something that to this day continues to inspire artists around the world. In all these works Kounellis drew from his deep knowledge of and sensitivity to cultures of the past and his own heritage, in itself a spirited discussion between collective and personal experiences.

    The exhibition at Parasol unit aims to consider Kounellis’s early works from the 1960s, 70s and 80s and his own response to them from today’s standpoint, which often culminates in a more recent and spontaneous work. This juxtaposition of works of art from the different decades should thus engender an arena for discussion. On show will be works, such as Untitled (Carboniera), 1967; Untitled (steel plate and braid),1969, on loan from Centre George Pompidou, Musée national d’art; Metamorphosis, 1984, and Untitled, 1977, an electric train moving on steel plates installed around one of the pillars of the Parasol unit gallery.

    Born in 1936 in Piraeus, Greece, Kounellis moved to Rome in 1956, where he still lives and works. In recent years, Kounellis has had numerous solo exhibitions internationally, including, among others, at Neue Nationalgalerie, Berlin, 2007; National Centre for Contemporary Art, Moscow, 2011; Today Art Museum, Beijing, 2011; and Museum of Cycladic Art, Athens, 2012.

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  • Kim Simonsson exhibition / Galerie Favardin & de Verneuil, Paris

    Kim Simonsson exhibition Galerie Favardin & de Verneuil, Paris

    Kim Simonsson exhibition / Galerie Favardin & de Verneuil, Paris
    October 16 - November 10, 2012

    One of the major artists of the young Finnish art scene, Kim Simonsson epitomizes this new generation of artists working beyond the ideologies of the post-modernism advocates, while his work is deep-rooted in pathos. Japanese manga leave its mark on his sculptures whose empathic dimension imparts them a universal impact.

    "Works by Kim Simonsson come from another world filled with children looking as doleful as well-behaved, as neat as vicious. (…) We find ourselves in stories of hybridisations and transmutations, in the land of hazy identities, sagas where beasts and beauties invert themselves, where innocence plays constantly with violence, purity and perversion, where black and white, gold and silver glaze various forms of anxiety, power struggles and child sexuality." (Elisabeth Védrenne, Connaissance des Arts, November 2009)

    Simonsson was awarded the prestigious “Young Artist of the Year” award in 2004 and the Pro Arte award in 2009. During the same year, he became the first Arabia Art Department Society Guest artist and got a studio at the famous manufactory. More recently he’s been selected for a residency at the Manufactory of Sevres.

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  • Carsten Nicolai - Unidisplay

    “The installation unidisplay offers an examination of semiotics and the laws of perception. The work operates with a number of modules of different visual effects that interfere with the viewers’ perception, through optical illusion, jitter, flicker, after-image, movement, complementary colour effect, and so on. The installation unfolds against a long projection wall with two mirror walls on the side thus visually expanding like a universe. The basic visual, made up of sequences, motifs and graphic translations of various units of time measurement acts as a world clock and evokes the intertwining of time, between past, present and future. The installation is created with Derivatice’s TouchDesigner software which has been used for alva noto live performances with a triple-screen projection.” (via)

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    (via rcruzniemiec-deactivated2013020)

  • David Gallagher

    David Gallagher Contemporary ceramic installations

    David Gallagher's profile on Ceramics Now Magazine - View his works

    David Gallagher is a ceramic artist from Philadelphia who completed his undergraduate work at the Tyler School of Art-Temple University. He is currently pursuing his Masters of Fine Arts at Kansas State University in Manhattan, Kansas.

    Research Statement
    In our current epoch of ever more rapid invention it becomes paramount to analyze our relationships to the technology we produce. Systems are created on the foundations of existing technology and are tied to the accepted modes of history and the present.  These technologies mediate our experiences with the physical world. We no longer have hundreds of years to determine appropriate uses for the technology we create. In many cases this time frame can be compressed to months or even weeks, with the only criteria for its evaluation being its novelty. These tools we create enter our perception with singularity of purpose, and yet cause repercussions though out our whole cultural existence.

    The primary focus of my artistic practice is the systems we create to manage our society. I am constantly investigating our understanding of the physical and psychological environments we construct. Humanity is driven to invent; to create tools that aid in the managing of society’s existence. Our instinctual proclivity to transcend what exists, to constantly refine and redefine our own existence is the central idea that drives my research. My work is a simulation and examination of systems that function within the constructs of social environments. These systems provide a framework for the investigation of the possibilities of context, specific iterations of conventional relationships.

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  • David Gallagher: Out Of Place, 2012, Ceramic, Wood, Cement, Audio, Video, Interactive Digital Projection

    David Gallagher is a ceramic artist from Philadelphia and completed his undergraduate work at the Tyler School of Art-Temple University. He is currently pursuing his Masters of Fine Arts at Kansas State University in Manhattan, Kansas.

    View David Gallagher’s works featured on Ceramics Now Magazine

    More ceramic artists »


  • David Gallagher: Liminal Processing of Euclidean Data to No Available End, 2011, Stoneware, Porcelain, Enamel, Monofilament, Florescent Light, Digital Processor, Motors, and Lasers

  • David Gallagher: William Jennings Bryan Gets a New Hat, 2011, Cast Porcelain, Enamel, Dimensional Lumber

  • David Gallagher: Gavage (Fracking Scanner), 2011, Coil-built Stoneware, Wood, Foam, QR Code, Website, Digital Processor, Laser

    Note: Laser Scans are surrounding the Vinyl QR code, which directs viewers to a website with Image Mapping.

  • David Gallagher: Inputs - Output, 2011, Handbuilt ceramics, mixed media

  • David Gallagher: Domestic Inversion, 2011, Porcelain, Enamel, LED, Wire, Lithium Rechargeable Battery


  • David Gallagher: Twitter, 2011, Porcelain, Wood, Digital Processor, Motion Sensor, Servo Motors

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