Paula Bellacera: Chubby BT (Boston Terrier), 11” x 12” x 8”, 2011, handbuilt, low-fire clay, glaze, underglaze

Paula Bellacera: Chubby BT (Boston Terrier), 11” x 12” x 8”, 2011, handbuilt, low-fire clay, glaze, underglaze

Debra Fleury: Flow, 2011. Red stoneware, porcelain and glaze. Fired to cone 10 (reduction atmosphere). Dimensions 28 cm x 28 cm x 7 cm

Debra Fleury: Flow, 2011. Red stoneware, porcelain and glaze. Fired to cone 10 (reduction atmosphere). Dimensions 28 cm x 28 cm x 7 cm

Debra Fleury: Husk, 2010. White Stoneware and underglaze. Fired to Cone 1 (neutral atmosphere). Dimensions 13 cm x 10 cm x 10 cm

Debra Fleury: Husk, 2010. White Stoneware and underglaze. Fired to Cone 1 (neutral atmosphere). Dimensions 13 cm x 10 cm x 10 cm

Debra Fleury: Succor, 2010. Dark Stoneware hollow form fired to cone 6 (neutral atmosphere). Dimensions 15 cm x 15 cm x 19 cm

Debra Fleury: Succor, 2010. Dark Stoneware hollow form fired to cone 6 (neutral atmosphere). Dimensions 15 cm x 15 cm x 19 cm

Debra Fleury: Ice, 2011. Dark Stoneware, Porcelain and glass. Fired to cone 6 (neutral atmosphere), (wall installation). Dimensions variable, average size per individual piece is approximately 5 cm x 5 cm x  7 cm

Debra Fleury: Ice, 2011. Dark Stoneware, Porcelain and glass. Fired to cone 6 (neutral atmosphere), (wall installation). Dimensions variable, average size per individual piece is approximately 5 cm x 5 cm x  7 cm

Debra Fleury: Glider, 2010. Porcelain. Fired to cone 10 (reduction atmosphere). Dimensions 50 cm x 15 cm x 17 cm

Debra Fleury: Glider, 2010. Porcelain. Fired to cone 10 (reduction atmosphere). Dimensions 50 cm x 15 cm x 17 cm

Debra Fleury: Bone, 2010. White Stoneware, Dark Stoneware and underglaze. Fired to cone 1 (neutral atmosphere). Dimensions 41 cm x 29 cm x 29 cm

Debra Fleury: Bone, 2010. White Stoneware, Dark Stoneware and underglaze. Fired to cone 1 (neutral atmosphere). Dimensions 41 cm x 29 cm x 29 cm

Cindy Billingsley

Cindy Billingsley Contemporary Ceramic sculptures on Ceramics Now

Cindy Billingsley's profile on Ceramics Now Magazine - View her works

Art should come from the heart of the artist, it should engage the audience, it should connect with the community, it should start a dialog, a debate. It should get people to look at things in a way they have not thought of, or to see what they have looked at but not really seen. Art has to come deeply from the artist, there has to be raw emotion and honesty in the work if it is to connect with people. An Artist paints and sculpts what they know. These are all the reasons I wanted to do a show about Alzheimer’s disease. To start a dialog, to connect, to get people to understand what it is like to have the disease, it is a part of my life, so it is what I know, what I am around. I took those thoughts and feelings and transformed them into visuals to engage my audience.
I speak through paint and clay. Art is a look inside the artist, what I am feeling is transferred into the clay while I am sculpting, Those feelings have to go somewhere. I wanted to tell a story, I wanted you to feel how it is, the frustrations, humor, the compassion and the heartache of having Alzheimer’s disease and for the ones caring for one with this disease.

William Faulkner said it best ~ The aim of every artist is to arrest motion, which is life, by artificial means and hold it fixed so that a hundred years later, when a stranger looks at it it moves again since it is life.

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