Ceramic artists list
> Ceramic artists list 100. Tim Rowan 99. Graciela Olio 98. Michal Fargo 97. Ryan Blackwell 96. Ellen Schön 95. Francesco Ardini 94. David Gallagher 93. Elizabeth Shriver 92. Jason Hackett 91. Patricia Sannit 90. Bente Skjøttgaard 89. Steve Belz 88. Ruth Power 87. Jenni Ward 86. Liliana Folta 85. Kira O'Brien 84. Annie Woodford 83. Kwok-Pong Bobby Tso 82. Bogdan Teodorescu 81. Kimberly Cook 80. Paula Bellacera 79. Debra Fleury 78. Cindy Billingsley 77. David Gilbaugh 76. Teresa & Helena Jané 75. Marianne McGrath 74. Suzanne Stumpf 73. Deborah Britt 72. Kathy Pallie 71. Els Wenselaers 70. Kjersti Lunde 69. Brian Kakas 68. Marie T. Hermann 67. Mark Goudy 66. Susan Meyer 65. Simcha Even-Chen 64. Barbara Fehrs 63. Shamai Gibsh 62. Natalia Dias 61. Bethany Krull 60. Amanda Simmons 59. Arthur Gonzalez 58. Chris Riccardo 57. Akiko Hirai W 56. Johannes Nagel 55. Rika Herbst 54. Liza Riddle 53. Chang Hyun Bang 52. Virginie Besengez 51. Jasmin Rowlandson 50. Chris Wight 49. Wim Borst 48. Rafael Peréz 47. Guðný Hafsteinsdóttir 46. Cathy Coëz 45. Merete Rasmussen 44. Carol Gouthro 43. JoAnn Axford 42. David Carlsson 41. Margrieta Jeltema 40. David Roberts 39. Patrick Colhoun 38. Abigail Simpson 37. Signe Schjøth 36. Katharine Morling 35. Dryden Wells 34. Antonella Cimatti 33. Cynthia Lahti 32. Carole Epp 31. Blaine Avery 30. Ian Shelly 29. Jim Kraft 28. Wesley Anderegg 27. Connie Norman 26. Arlene Shechet 25. Young Mi Kim 24. Jason Walker 23. Peter Meanley 22. Shane Porter 21. Jennifer McCurdy 20. Yoichiro Kamei 19. Debbie Quick 18. Ian F Thomas 17. John Shirley 16. Grayson Perry 15. Vivika & Otto Heino 14. Georges Jeanclos 13. Daniel Kavanagh 12. Nagae Shigekazu 11. Matthew Chambers 10. Tim Andrews 9. Claire Muckian 8. Adam Frew 7. Maciej Kasperski 6. Roxanne Jackson 5. Keith Schneider 4. Celeste Bouvier 3. Tim Scull 2. Kim Westad 1. Sara Paloma

ceramic art


Kevork Cholakian: Artist’s Studio Chairs, 2012-2013

Chairs are an essential part for our every day existence,they virtually go unnoticed. Yet how we use them tells us something about the person who uses them. By creating this series of artist’s chairs in clay I transform something otherwise mundane and challenge our preconception of the use of materials and prompt a closer look at the seemingly ordinary.


  • Eszter Imre: Must-produced, 2012

    Series of porcelain sculptures made of factory waste as interpretations of my opinion on perfection. Imperfection can be so tempting and beautiful that it feels complete and exquisite.


  • Lucy Gresley: Vessels, 2014

    Vessels is a collection of work that explores the idea of vessels, both as containers and as metaphors for people and their emotions.  My artwork is often about thinking and reflecting – in this case, investigating the different meanings and connotations of vessels. For example, I am interested in the psychoanalytic idea of caregivers as emotional containers, who can hold and re-interpret strong feelings. I am also fascinated by alchemy and particularly the use of vessels in alchemy as sites of transformation.

    In making this work, I have become interested in vessels that cannot be used or that will not contain anything. I imagine that vessels can be like people – elegant, funny, self-contained, ineffectual, silly, detached or spilling their contents – and I have played with their form to reflect this. I enjoy mistakes and forms that are intentionally wrong – collapsing spouts and vases without openings. I am also attracted to the anthropomorphic qualities of pots and vases.

    I enjoy the freedom of working in clay, which I find a very direct and playful medium. I am also interested in the dialogue between these ceramic pieces and my collage work, which I can use to infer ideas and create narratives.


  • Güliz Korkmaz Tirkeş: Flow Series, 2010-2013

    My work in general may be considered as formed under the effect of an outer force. While this force may reveal itself as irregular linear textures on some forms, in others the body itself is bent or squeezed according to the strength and direction of this force. However, the force is not detrimental, but naturally welcomed by the forms.

    The flow series also appear as a result of the forces applied by large volumes. The effects of these volumes on these works are embraced with soft and smooth movements and can be traced on the form with a natural flow. As in my other works this also may be seen as traces of an outer force, but these traces are outcomes that are formed within a natural flow and are affirmed by the form. The final form stands upright with its pure, content energy shaped by this feeling of embrace.


  • Brett Freund: Bliss Point - The amount of an ingredient that optimizes palatability, 2013-2014

    This project is a exploration of repetition and balance while researching the aesthetic parameters of different materials. These recent vessels represent an indulgence in making with consideration to how choice creates form. My background is rooted in traditional pottery and it’s important to me for my work to best reflect the world that I feel is around me.


  • Michael Boroniec: Spatial Spirals, 2013

    What began with teapots and a single spiral, has evolved into a series of vases that vary in form, degree of expansion, and number of coils. Each vessel is wheel thrown then deconstructed. This process reveals aspects of the vase that most rarely encounter. Within the walls, maker’s marks become evident and contribute to the texture. The resultant ribbon effect, reminiscent of a wheel trimming, lends fragility, elegance, and motion to a medium generally perceived as hard and heavy. This emphasizes a resistance of gravity, allowing negative space to unravel and become part of the form. The result is a body of sculptural objects, resembling and born of functional vessels.

  • Transformation 9: Contemporary Works in Ceramics / Contemporary Craft, Pittsburgh

    Transformation 9: Contemporary Works in Ceramics at Contemporary Craft

    Transformation 9: Contemporary Works in Ceramics / Contemporary Craft, Pittsburgh
    April 25 - November 1, 2014

    The Transformation series, one of the Society for Contemporary Craft’s signature programs, was established in 1997 as a biennial juried exhibition focusing on traditional craft media–glass, wood, metal, clay, and found materials–in rotation. The exhibition seeks out an international selection of artists redefining their medium to create work that is challenging and thought provoking; inviting us all to reconsider our notion of “craft.”

    This year’s focus is on clay. Clay has been used, decorated, coveted, and collected for thousands of years, yet in the hands of contemporary artists this irresistible medium continues to surprise through innovative techniques, forms, and functions. Visitors are invited to see what happens when makers push the boundaries of time-honored craft materials—right before our eyes, something old is new again.

    In conjunction with each Transformation exhibition, the jurors award the participating artist whose work best displays the tenets of excellence and innovation the Elizabeth R. Raphael Founder’s Prize. Named in honor of SCC’s founder, the award is accompanied by a $5000 cash prize.

    Transformation 9: Contemporary Works in Ceramics features the work of all 31 of the Raphael Prize finalists, a selection of internationally recognized and emerging artists. The exhibition highlights outstanding and innovative examples of contemporary works in clay, all of which have been created within the last year. The work of three regional artists—Chuck Johnson of Venango, PA, Erica Nickol of Pittsburgh, PA, and Ian Thomas of Slippery Rock, PA—is included in the exhibition.

    Linda Swanson of Montreal, Quebec has been selected as the winner of the Society for Contemporary Craft’s (SCC) 2013 Elizabeth R. Raphael Founder’s Prize competition. Two honorable mention honorees, Lauren Gallaspy of Salt Lake City, UT and Lee Somers of Montevallo, AL, and one merit recipient, Lauren Mabry of Philadelphia, PA, were also announced at the exhibition opening on April 25, 2014.

    Swanson’s winning entry, Cypreus Lumen, 2013, is a 20 inch round wall disk made from crystalline glazed porcelain with a painted aluminum rim. The turquoise glaze looks almost liquid with the faintest ripple of movement on the surface. A patch of deep red disrupts the calm in a dynamic swirl of motion. “Processes of change, formation, and dissolution are caught in this crystalline glazed surface,” says Swanson of the piece. “A flow of molten colorants in an optically ambivalent and luminous frozen moment recalls geology as well as biology, and elicits material affinities between the body and the world around us.”

    Linda Swanson Ceramics - 2013 Raphael Prize Winner

    As the 2013 Raphael Prize winner, Swanson shows several other ceramic works in Transformation 9, each exploring the changing nature of matter. A site-specific installation similar to her piece Osmogenesis (recently seen at the Northern Clay Center in Minneapolis, MN) was installed in SCC’s main gallery throughout the run of the exhibition. Combining the slow and steady drip of water onto a clay-covered steel surface, the piece is constantly changing. As the water burrows through the clay, the underlying metal surface is exposed in a collection of bubbling craters. Swanson describes the piece as exploring the “interdependence of organism and environment, as well as organism and organism – in which one species is created, or at least sustained, by and through another.”

    Born in Los Angeles, CA, Swanson received her B.A. in Art History from University of California Santa Barbara, her B.F.A. in Ceramics from California State University, and her M.F.A. in Ceramics from the School of Art and Design at Alfred University, Alfred, NY. Currently, she lives in Montreal, Canada where she is an Assistant Professor at Concordia University. Swanson’s ceramics have been exhibited in SOFA Chicago with the Lacoste Gallery, Elemental at the Northern Clay Center in Minneapolis, and INFESTATION, a public art installation at the Parcs Canada Lachine Canal Historic Site in Montreal. In 2013, Swanson was named an Emerging Artist by NCECA, the National Council on Education for the Ceramic Arts.

    An honorable mention award was given to Lauren Gallaspy for her piece, Giving Up the Ghost, 2014. The startling 16” tall sculpture combines soft, feminine lines with a mass of ceramics shards and strips. Gallaspy received her M.F.A. in Ceramics from Alfred University and has been named a NCECA Emerging Artist. She describes her work as being “about imbalance—the vulnerability of living things— and the sometimes violent, sometimes pleasurable, almost always complex consequences that occur when bodies and objects in the world come into contact with one another.”

    A second honorable mention award was presented to Lee Sommers for his work, Scape IV, 2014. Having also received his M.F.A. in Ceramics from Alfred University, his work has been exhibited throughout the United States and China. Known for his distinctive ceramic collages, Sommers explains his process as “a coupling of fleeting notions and physical realities. Collage is a key strategy in both the physical and conceptual organization of my work. Drawing from a variety of sources, ongoing acts of sampling, collecting and cataloging, leads to a critical mass of components. Weaving a matrix of relations between these parts, I find compositional epiphanies - parallels to aesthetic experiences etched in my memory.”

    Additionally, the jurors gave a merit award to Lauren Mabry for her piece, Curved Plane, 2013. The artist, a M.F.A. graduate from University of Nebraska-Lincoln, describes her work as “painterly, abstract, ceramic sculpture.”

    Lauren Mabry Ceramics at Transformation 9

    The jury for the 2013 prize was composed of Joshua Green, Executive Director of the National Council on Education for the Ceramic Arts; Jae Won Lee, a Korean American ceramic artist and Associate Professor at Michigan State University; Alexandra Raphael, enamel artist, London, England; Catherine Raphael, metalsmith and storyteller, Pittsburgh, PA; Kate Lydon, Director of Exhibitions at SCC; and Janet McCall, Executive Director at SCC.

    “This prize honors artists who are redefining the boundaries of their media to create work that is challenging and thought-provoking. The strength and recognition of this competition has grown over the past 17 years and continues to challenge our viewers understanding of craft today,” said McCall.

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  • Ewen Henderson / Erskine, Hall & Coe, London

    Ewen Henderson ceramics exhibition at Erskine Hall and Coe

    Ewen Henderson / Erskine, Hall & Coe, London
    May 6 - June 5, 2014

    "I fell in love with both the material and the vessel as a magical form; but it was a long time before I realised how I wanted to use it… I was seduced by the alchemy of change where you take a material…and it is transmogrified into something else."

    Born in Staffordshire in 1934, Henderson became interested in painting and sculpture while working for a timber company in Cardiff and started attending evening classes at the local art school. In 1964 Henderson began a foundation course at Goldsmiths College in London where he first encountered clay. Later he would study ceramics under, among others, Hans Coper and Lucie Rie, at the Camberwell School of Art.  But he always made time to draw and paint. He graduated in 1968 and continued his studies at Edinburgh College of Art before returning to London.

    Hendereson very soon left the wheel behind and moved to the freedom of hand-building. Throughout his career he explored clay as a medium in its own right, and said of his work that:

    "It explores the significance of what is broken, torn or cut, the ability of single or multiple forms to speak of either compression or expansion, flatness or fullness. It is a kind of drawing in three dimensions. I start with fragments - familiar, found, improvised - and then build up to complex structures that invite the observer to complete the circuit, so to speak, by considering such matters as memory, invention and metaphor."

    In parallel with ceramics his passion for painting continued throughout his career, with watercolours, gouaches and collages becoming increasingly inseparable from his ceramics.

    Ancient cultures, geological forms and landscapes were persistent influences during his career - Avebury, Eden Valley in Cumbria, the Rollright Stones in north Oxfordshire, Orkney, and Manorbier in Pembrokeshire where he had a home for the last year of his life.

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  • 2nd International Ceramic Art Symposium “LANDescape” - Ceramic Laboratory: Call for Applications

    2nd International Ceramic Art SYmposium LANDescape Daugavpils

    2nd International Ceramic Art Symposium “LANDescape” - Ceramic Laboratory: Call for Applications
    Submissions deadline: June 15, 2014

    Dates: August 11-25, 2014
    Location: Mark Rothko Art Center, Daugavpils, Latvia

    International Ceramic Art Symposium “LANDescape” 2014 is a joint initiative of Daugavpils Clay Art Center and Daugavpils Rothko Art Center which emerged from both partner organizations’ activities and cooperation aimed at promoting contemporary art, including contemporary ceramic processes in Latvia.

    In the framework of planned ceramic symposium “LANDescape”, drawing inspiration both from Latvian nature and cultural space, as well as personal world, the participants are invited to create unique ceramic art works with their chosen materials and techniques, although there is a conjunctive theme, that indicates „spurting”, „escaping” „getting away”, etc.

    The “LANDescape” symposium is being organized for the second time, and this year’s symposium is assigned with an additional title - Ceramic Laboratory. This year our aim is to create a kind of laboratory, where artists experiment and share their experience with each other in different ceramic firing technologies. While choosing the symposium participants, priority will be given to artists who, alongside the creative work will offer a firing master class and/or public lecture dedicated to the ceramics or ceramic technologies, which will subsequently be published in the catalogue of the symposium.

    Symposium Organizers: Daugavpils Mark Rothko Art Center in collaboration with association „Daugavpils Clay Art Center” Symposium aims:
    1. To create unique contemporary ceramic objects for Latvian art and cultural space, to create a platform for artists to exchange experiences and generate creative idea, as well as to promote contemporary ceramic processes in the society;
    2. To promote high quality contemporary art availability to public, raise public interest in culture, preservation of cultural heritage, to promote the creation of new artworks and their collections.

    Symposium participants: 15 professional ceramists participate in the Symposium. Selection of the participants will be held taking into consideration the materials sent (Application, CV and visual information that are sent, taking into consideration the regulations below).

    Symposium organizers’ liabilities:
    1. Artists’ accommodation costs in Daugavpils (hotel and meals);
    2. Working studios;
    3. Working materials: clay (1000 ºC), chamotte clay (1000-1100 ºC), glaze.
    4. Opportunity to use wood-firing kiln, electric kiln, as well as a chance to explore different types of individual firing;
    5. Publicity (information in mass media, publishing of symposium catalogue);
    6. Recreation possibilities: tour around the city and region, visiting educational arts establishments in Daugavpils;
    7. Opportunity to present a creative work;
    8. Symposium opening exhibition (opening on August 12, 2014);
    9. Symposium final exhibition (opening on August 23, 2014).

    Artist liabilities:
    1. Travel costs to Daugavpils and return home;
    2. Other materials and instruments necessary for work;
    3. Workshop and/or lecture presentation in frame of the symposium;
    4. To donate one art work from symposium opening exhibition to Daugavpils Mark Rothko Art Center (art works should be brought to the symposium opening exhibition);
    5. To donate one art work, which will be created during the symposium, and which will be chosen by specially organized jury, to Daugavpils Clay Art Centre;
    6. During first 5 days after receiving the invitation, an artist needs to confirm his/her participation (until July 10, 2014).

    For further information, download the regulations (.pdf).
    Click here to apply online.

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  • State of Flux / An Talla Solais, Ullapool, Scotland

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    State of Flux / An Talla Solais, Ullapool, Scotland
    April 17 - June 1, 2014

    Featuring work by: Edina Andrási, Artúr van Balen, Fiona Byrne Sutton, Melanie Davies, Sinéad Dunn, Morgane Deffense, Tilly Gifford, Nicola Henderson, Kevin Morris, Emma Pratt, Ester Svensson.
    Curated by Kevin Morris and Fergus Stewart.

    Clay, in a state of perpetual flux, formed formed by the earth and then in the hands of the artist, will be transformed again in the eyes of visitors to this exhibition at An Talla Solais. Led by two artists, Fergus Stewart a well-established potter in the highlands and Kevin Morris a highly acclaimed new graduate from Aberdeenshire, State of Flux features a wide range of handmade and unique pieces of ceramic art from eleven of Scotland’s finest graduates.

    Artúr van Balen’s installation of porcelain chickens reinvents the polystyrene wrapped, headless mounds of poultry meat bought in supermarkets into precious and valuable objects, these ceramic sculptures were cast in Berlin where porcelain was once more expensive than gold.

    ‘A Journey’ by Ester Svensson creates an imaginative world using porcelain, wood and string. Strange creatures and morphed forms which are delicately glazed create a three-dimensional fairy tale, open to interpretation.

    These pieces contrast well with the aesthetic of Fiona Byrne-Sutton’s press moulded vessels, which are physical expressions of geological processes. Her vigorous handling of clay is a balance of risk and control. Each of her vessels are unique, formed with black stoneware and embedded with clays she digs up near the principal rivers of Scotland. Nicola Henderson’s open formed vessels are also rich in geological reference. Her vessels are influenced by a type of metamorphic rock known as gneiss. Deep beneath the earth’s crust these rock are formed under huge temperatures and pressure causing separate layers to form which compress and distort, giving the impression of waves and movement. Henderson has developed this layering effect in an attempt to impart a subtle energy and flow. She says ‘I wanted to reflect the fact that though we think of rock as something static, unmalleable and permanent, it is in a state of flux, having a life cycle of its own, changing and recycling itself over millions of years’.

    Alongside this exhibition runs a series of educational activities using clay, including artist-led workshops in slip casting, mold making, throwing, and constructing and firing in an outdoor kiln.  These activities are designed to introduce participants to the different ways of working with this inspiring material through hands-on experience. These workshops will be taught by artists involved in the exhibition, providing a very rare opportunity for visitors to interact with real specialists and explore new art forms, literally getting their hands dirty!

    The project State of Flux has grown out of the fact that opportunities to learn how to work with clay have dwindled a great deal over recent years. In 2012 Scotland’s last specialist degree course in Ceramics closed and it is no longer possible to study this subject as a full degree. An Talla Solais has acquired a brand new kiln in the light of this lack and this exhibition is just the beginning.

    Thanks to Highland Stoneware and Breedon Aggregates who sponsored this exhibition.

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  • Month in Review: February 2014

    Month in Review, February 2014 at Ceramics Now

    Hello friends. Welcome to Month in Review, a summary of the last month of activity here at Ceramics Now.
    Sign up for our email newsletter and follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Google Plus.

    We offer limited sponsorship opportunities for those who want to connect with our global readership of professional artists and ceramic art enthusiasts.

    Subscribe to Ceramics Now Magazine, the international bi-annual journal that promotes critical discussion about contemporary ceramics through interviews, artist projects and reviews.

    Exhibition galleries
    Jun Kaneko: Black & White at Bentley Gallery, Phoenix, Arizona
    Lynda Benglis at Cheim & Read Gallery, New York
    William O’Brien: The Lovers at Almine Rech Gallery, Paris
    Şirin Koçak at Kuğulu Art Gallery, Ankara, Turkey
    Mixed Display 2014 at Marsden Woo Gallery, London

    Exhibitions
    Gunhild Rudjord and Nils Erik Gjerdevik / Copenhagen Ceramics, Denmark
    Gail Goldsmith: Everyday Weapons / William Holman Gallery, New York
    Klara Kristalova: Underworld / Galerie Perrotin, New York
    Modern and Contemporary Ceramics: Anita Kay Hardy and Gregory Kaslo Collection / Boise Art Museum, Idaho
    Beyond Craft: Decorative Arts from the Leatrice S. and Melvin B. Eagle Collection / Museum of Fine Arts, Houston
    Rose Cabat at 100: A Retrospective Exhibition of Ceramics / Tucson Museum of Art, Arizona
    EPURE by Daniela Schlagenhauf & Nathalie Jover / Les Ateliers galerie de L’Ô, Bruxelles
    Johan Tahon: Albarelli for all sores / Valerie Traan Gallery, Antwerp
    Jun Kaneko: Black & White / Bentley Gallery, Phoenix, Arizona
    Best Kept Secret: The Scripps College Ceramic Collection / American Museum of Ceramic Art, Pomona, California
    Lynda Benglis / Cheim & Read Gallery, New York
    Dark Light: The Micaceous Ceramics of Christine Nofchissey McHorse / Houston Center for Contemporary Craft
    Şirin Koçak / Kuğulu Art Gallery, Ankara, Turkey
    William J. O’Brien: The Lovers / Almine Rech Gallery, Paris
    Anders Ruhwald and Matt Ziemke / The Clay Studio, Philadelphia
    Yeesookyung: The Meaning of Time / Locks Gallery, Philadelphia
    Anne Wenzel: The Opaque Palace / TENT Rotterdam
    James Tower / Erskine, Hall & Coe Gallery, London
    Simon Fujiwara / Contemporary Art Society, London
    Sculpture 2014 / Brenda May Gallery, Sydney

  • Month in Review: December 2013

    Month in Review, December 2013 at Ceramics Now - Ceramics Magazine

    Hello friends. Welcome to Month in Review, a summary of the last month of activity here at Ceramics Now.
    Sign up for our email newsletter and follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Google Plus.

    We offer limited sponsorship opportunities for those who want to connect with our global readership of professional artists and ceramic art enthusiasts.

    Subscribe to Ceramics Now Magazine, the international bi-annual journal that promotes critical discussion about contemporary ceramics through interviews, artist projects and reviews.

    Featured artists
    Michal Fargo - View works

    Interviews
    Ken Eastman - Featured now
    Bente Skjottgaard - Featured now
    Liliana Folta - Spotlight
    Els Wenselaers - Spotlight
    David D. Gilbaugh (The Tectonic Method) - Ceramic Technique

    Reviews
    Mungyeong Traditional Tea Bowl Festival

    Exhibitions
    CLASS OF 2013 / The National Centre for Craft and Design, Sleaford, UK
    Betty Woodman: CONTRO VERSIES CONTRO VERSIA / Gallery Diet, Miami
    Yô Akiyama exhibition / ARTCOURT Gallery, Osaka, Japan
    Uku Rere: Nga Kaihanga Uku and beyond / Whangarei Art Museum, New Zeeland
    Mud and Water exhibition / Rokeby Gallery, London
    HYPERCLAY: Contemporary Ceramics / Gladstone Regional Art Gallery & Museum, Australia
    Ceramics/Glass / Ukrainian Institute of Modern Art, Chicago
    Esencia 2013 by Sanserif Creatius: Japanese and Valencian Craftsmanship / Valencia, Spain
    Craftsmanship in Ceramics, Jewellery, Basketry and Wood / Oxford Ceramics Gallery, Oxford, UK
    Susanne Silvertant / Terra Delft Gallery, Delft, the Netherlands
    Keisho-Ha - A New Materialism and the Yufuku Aesthetic / Yufuku Gallery, Tokyo
    Kerry Jameson: Unbounded / Marsden Woo Gallery, London
    Ken Mihara: Serenity in Clay / Liverpool Street Gallery, Sydney

    Exhibition galleries
    Ceramics and Glass at the Ukrainian Institute of Modern Art, Chicago

    Calls for applications and news
    7 Ceramic Art Competitions and Fairs Where You Should Participate in 2014

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