Ceramic artists list
> Ceramic artists list 100. Tim Rowan 99. Graciela Olio 98. Michal Fargo 97. Ryan Blackwell 96. Ellen Schön 95. Francesco Ardini 94. David Gallagher 93. Elizabeth Shriver 92. Jason Hackett 91. Patricia Sannit 90. Bente Skjøttgaard 89. Steve Belz 88. Ruth Power 87. Jenni Ward 86. Liliana Folta 85. Kira O'Brien 84. Annie Woodford 83. Kwok-Pong Bobby Tso 82. Bogdan Teodorescu 81. Kimberly Cook 80. Paula Bellacera 79. Debra Fleury 78. Cindy Billingsley 77. David Gilbaugh 76. Teresa & Helena Jané 75. Marianne McGrath 74. Suzanne Stumpf 73. Deborah Britt 72. Kathy Pallie 71. Els Wenselaers 70. Kjersti Lunde 69. Brian Kakas 68. Marie T. Hermann 67. Mark Goudy 66. Susan Meyer 65. Simcha Even-Chen 64. Barbara Fehrs 63. Shamai Gibsh 62. Natalia Dias 61. Bethany Krull 60. Amanda Simmons 59. Arthur Gonzalez 58. Chris Riccardo 57. Akiko Hirai W 56. Johannes Nagel 55. Rika Herbst 54. Liza Riddle 53. Chang Hyun Bang 52. Virginie Besengez 51. Jasmin Rowlandson 50. Chris Wight 49. Wim Borst 48. Rafael Peréz 47. Guðný Hafsteinsdóttir 46. Cathy Coëz 45. Merete Rasmussen 44. Carol Gouthro 43. JoAnn Axford 42. David Carlsson 41. Margrieta Jeltema 40. David Roberts 39. Patrick Colhoun 38. Abigail Simpson 37. Signe Schjøth 36. Katharine Morling 35. Dryden Wells 34. Antonella Cimatti 33. Cynthia Lahti 32. Carole Epp 31. Blaine Avery 30. Ian Shelly 29. Jim Kraft 28. Wesley Anderegg 27. Connie Norman 26. Arlene Shechet 25. Young Mi Kim 24. Jason Walker 23. Peter Meanley 22. Shane Porter 21. Jennifer McCurdy 20. Yoichiro Kamei 19. Debbie Quick 18. Ian F Thomas 17. John Shirley 16. Grayson Perry 15. Vivika & Otto Heino 14. Georges Jeanclos 13. Daniel Kavanagh 12. Nagae Shigekazu 11. Matthew Chambers 10. Tim Andrews 9. Claire Muckian 8. Adam Frew 7. Maciej Kasperski 6. Roxanne Jackson 5. Keith Schneider 4. Celeste Bouvier 3. Tim Scull 2. Kim Westad 1. Sara Paloma

contemporary artist

Wesley Anderegg: Dog Taimer

  • Daniel Kavanagh

    Daniel Kavanagh's profile on Ceramics Now Magazine - View his works

    “Forms are classical yet contemporary defined by crisp elegant lines and flowing shapes; inspired by ancient Greek pottery and Japanese as well as the art and architecture of South East Asia. The Highland landscape is a constant, ever changing influence in my work, drawing inspiration from the light, space and reflective qualities this vast landscape offers.

    Contrast is an important aspect to my work the interplay between control and unpredictability, traditional and contemporary, solid but with a feeling of lightness. Despite these contrasting qualities I always aspire to create something that is both beautiful and complete. I enjoy the interplay of more organic and fortuitous surfaces applied to these controlled forms which create a distinct finish to the work. Work that combines ceramic and bronze materials provide an innovative exploration of the two mediums I am most passionate about. I am beginning to explore the experience of how a thrown form can then be adapted to become a piece of sculpture in its own right.” Daniel Kavanagh

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  • Adam Frew

    Adam Frew's profile on Ceramics Now Magazine - View his works

    Adam is a story teller, sometimes intuitively, always spontaneously, and this reveals itself in his work.  The white porcelain is a perfect ground for the inky cobalt drawings which decorate his pots. Some imagery is restrained to the simplicity of a single line and other images depict busy narratives. Simple sprigs reminiscent of wax seals from a bygone era embellish some of the surfaces.

    “It is important that there is a flow in my work and if I loose that flow, I loose the energy. My work is an ongoing journey”. Adam Frew

    ‘The nature of Adam’s ceramic pots allows the owner to continually revisit their purchase, gaining pleasure from seeing new and wonderful things in its quirky decoration.’ Kim Mawhinney, Head of Art. Ulster Museum

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  • Maciej Kasperski

    Maciej Kasperski's profile on Ceramics Now Magazine - View his works

    “I am interested in the mutual relations between form and function of an object. It is connected with my belief in an exceptional aesthetic value of every-day items. Functionality comes for me as a starting point for analysing an aesthetic form.
     
    I aspire to make art understandable, if not on the level of rational or intelectual analysis, then at least on the level of feelings, senses or aesthetic pleasure.” Maciej Kasperski

    Maciej Kasperski was born in 1969. In 1996 graduated from Ceramics and Glass Department of Academy of Fine Arts in Wrocław. At present, he is a tutor at the Ceramics Faculty of AFA in Wrocław.

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  • Roxanne Jackson

    Roxanne Jackson's profile on Ceramics Now Magazine - View her works

    Read the interview with Roxanne Jackson, Artist of the month - June-July 2011

    “In my work, I explore images of extinction, death and transformation. I am fascinated with the natural processes of decay and destruction—particularly when in conflict with human systems. Nature is referenced, not by depicting the virile stag, but by illustrating its inevitable decay. Valuing macabre sensibilities, I create sculptures that cross over the slippery edge of life into what might lie beyond.

    An investigation of the unconscious mind and our inextricable link to the animal world may reveal certain truths about the human condition. “Lyuba Twins” is a purposely-ambiguous sculpture—the animals, although realistically rendered, are non-specific in species (are they deer, sheep, baby buffaloes)? They are also defined as neither alive or dead. The viewer is invited to interpret the sculpture in a similar way that a ‘subject’ is asked to interpret an inkblot from the legendary Rorschach Technique. As the interpretation of the inkblot theoretically reveals a description of the subconscious mind of the subject, the viewers’ interpretation of this piece may also provide insight.

    Occasionally, I use imagery from horror films and the moment of transformation—particularly, when a human becomes a beast. This transgressive imagery creates tension in the work, especially when produced from the medium of clay—with its strong historical ties to comfort and beauty. Rooted in traditions of pantheism and superstition, the horror movie depicts a dark side of human nature. Mutated creatures, such as the ravenous werewolf, are created in the murky depths of our collective subconscious. These images ride the boundaries between animal and human, instinct and reason, the conscious and the subconscious.

    In a more humorous tone, recent pieces such as “Hoof Heels” also evoke our inextricable link to the animal world. The heels are inspired by both contemporary fashion trends  (Designer AF Vandevorst) and ancient folklore (Pan). They imply that the fashion-conscious viewer can easily embody the primal, animal self.

    This investigation reveals the honesty of humanity. Embracing all aspects of ourselves, taking a closer look at the “shadow side” of the human condition is my attempt to discover truth. This truth stems from acknowledging our imperfections and recognizing humanness (and dignity). Comprised of evocative, poignant layers of meaning, I invite the viewer to contemplate what it means to be human, to connect with a deeper side of oneself.” Roxanne Jackson

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  • Arlene Shechet: Blow by blow

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